This movie includes one or more students with significant cognitive disabilities. Other student characteristics that are observable in the movie include physical disabilities and communication impairments.

  • Primary Area of ELA Instruction Addressed: Speaking / Listening
  • Secondary Area of ELA Instruction Addressed: Writing
  • Classroom Type: Inclusive setting
  • Grade Range: Lower elementary

English Language Arts Common Core Essential Element Alignment

Below are the ELA Essential Elements that are observable in this movie:

Primary Essential Elements:

  • EE.SL.K.1.a Participate in conversations with others. Communicate directly with supportive adults or peers.
  • Secondary Essential Elements:

  • EE.W.K.1 With guidance and support, select a familiar book and use drawing, dictating, or writing to state an opinion about it.
  • EE.W.K.7 With guidance and support, participate in collective research and writing projects.
  • EE.SL.K.6 With guidance and support, communicate thoughts, feelings, and ideas.
  • Extra ELA Connections

    The strategies shown in the movie may also apply to the ELA Essential Elements listed below:

  • EE.W.K.Two With guidance and support, select a familiar topic and use drawing, dictating, or writing to share information about the topic.
  • EE.W.K.Three With guidance and support, select an event and use drawing, dictating, or writing and share information about it.
  • EE.W.1.1 Select a familiar book and use drawing, dictating, or writing to state an opinion about it.
  • EE.W.1.Two Select a familiar topic and use drawing, dictating, or writing to share information about it.
  • EE.W.1.Three Select an event and use drawing, dictating, or writing to share information about it.
  • EE.SL.1.1.a Participate in conversations with adults. Engage in multiple-turn exchanges with supportive adults.
  • EE.W.Two.1 Select a book and write, draw, or dictate to state an opinion about it.
  • EE.W.Two.Two Select a topic and use drawing, dictating, or writing to compose a message with one fact about the topic.
  • EE.W.Two.Trio Select an event or individual practice and use drawing, writing, or dictating to compose a message about it.
  • EE.SL.Two.1.a Participate in conversations with adults and peers. Engage in multiple-turn exchanges with peers with support from an adult.
  • EE.L.Two.Three.a Use language to achieve desired outcomes when communicating. Use symbolic language when communicating.
  • EE.W.Trio.Ten Write routinely for a diversity of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • EE.SL.Trio.1.a Engage in collaborative discussions. Engage in collaborative interactions about texts.
  • EE.L.Three.Trio.a Use language to achieve desired outcomes when communicating. Use language to make elementary requests, comment, or share information.
  • EE.W.Four.Ten Write routinely for a diversity of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
  • EE.SL.Four.1.a Engage in collaborative discussions. Contribute ideas from prior skill of a text during discussions about the same text.
  • EE.SL.6.1.c Engage in collaborative discussions. Ask and response questions specific to the topic, text, or issue under discussion.
  • EE.SL.7.1.c Engage in collaborative discussions. Remain on the topic of the discussion when answering questions or making other contributions to a discussion.
  • EE.L.Four.Three.c Use language to achieve desired outcomes when communicating. Communicate effectively with peers and adults.
  • Iowa Core Essential Elements listed above are based on the Common Core State Standards Initiative © Copyright 2010. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers. All rights reserved.

    Extra Instructional Resources

    Dynamic Learning Maps – Professional Development
    View extra resources supporting this strategy from the Center for Literacy and Disability Studies, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  • Module: Emergent Writing
  • Module: Writing: Text Types and Purposes
  • Module: Writing Information and Explanation Texts
  • Scoring Scale Five: Writing: Text Types and Purposes (Page 81)
    Iowa Department of Education
    Iowa’s Alternate Assessments for Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities
    https://www.educateiowa.gov/documents/content-areas/2015/11/scoring-guide-dynamic-learning-maps-aligned-k-3-early-literacy

    Adult-Student Emergent Writing Interaction Inventory
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | School of Medicine
    Department of Allied Health Sciences | Center for Literacy and Disability Studies
    https://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/clds/resources/deaf-blind-model-classroom-resources/Emerg%20Wrtg%20Obs%20Inventory.pdf

    Emergent Writing for Students with Significant Disabilities
    LiveBinders.com | Nicole Kertis
    http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=1111536

    Students with Significant Disabilities, Including Deaf-Blindness: Getting Began with Emergent Writing
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | School of Medicine
    Department of Allied Health Sciences | Center for Literacy and Disability Studies
    https://www.med.unc.edu/ahs/clds/files/teacher-handouts/Emergent%20Wrtg%20Activities.pdf

    This movie features educators and students from the following school:

    Sioux City Community Schools, Sioux City, IA

    Deborah Bzoski, Special Education Teacher – Unity Elementary School
    Kelly Hoak, Speech Language Pathologist – Unity Elementary School

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    admin_en | 1@1.com

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